Saturday, May 25, 2019

Memorial Day—Pat Tillman

LOOKING BACK
By John Turney
Art by P. Klatt, available HERE
The Pat Tillman story is particularly unnerving in that we was killed in action by friendly fire—one of the most tragic events in war, which is a series of tragic events punctuated by heroism.

Tillman was the Pac-10 Defensive Player of the Year in 1997 and as a 7th round pick became a starter for the Arizona Cardinals in 1998. In 2000 Paul Zimmerman named him to his personal Sports Illustrated All-Pro team in a season he made 145 tackles, 1.5 sacks and a pick.

After 9/11 Tillman heeded his personal call to service when he told himself "I haven't done a damn thing for this country". He was offered a three-year $3.6 million contract by the St. Louis Rams, which was matched by the Cardinals and told friends and family he'd have never left the Cardinals because they gave him his chance as a 7th round pick.

So, he and his brother enlisted and by the time the 2002 NFL season would have rolled around he had finished basic training and he was off to Ranger School to become one of the 'elite' and a year later he did just that.

In 2004 he was killed when Army Rangers Steven Elliott and Sgt. Greg Baker opened fire on be Tillman's position, believing there were "no friendlies" in the area. The lighting was poor and the intel was poor according to Elliott who says he has carrier tremendous guilt and has suffered PTSD over the incident.

Baker misidentified an allied Afghan soldier and Tillman enemy combatants and opened fire, killing the Afghan and prompting Elliott and two other Rangers to fire upon "shadowy images" that were later identified to be Tillman and serviceman Bryan O'Neal.

There were reports of Tillman's heroism, and then there was a coverup by the Army, apparently, it was too painful to admit the truth—that an American hero was accidentally killed in action by other Americans.

The coverup prompted conspiracy theories that he was murdered (a belief held by Tillman's mother at one point) but none of that has proven true. What was true is that Tillman had turned against the War effort and opposed then-President Bush and was in contact with Noam Chomsky (and anti-war critic) and told friends that after his service he'd publically oppose the war.

We don't know the facts on all that. Greater minds than ours can search through the evidence and figure it out. All we know is that Tillman didn't have to serve. He chose to, sacrificing millions of dollars to do so and that we respect.

So, in our view, he did do "a damn thing for his county". He set a tremendous example and that's a big thing. A very big thing.

For his service, Tillman was awarded the following medals and badges:
Silver Star
Purple Heart
Meritorious Service Medal
Army Achievement Medal
National Defense Service Medal
Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal
Global War on Terrorism Service Medal
Army Service Ribbon
Presidential Unit Citation
Joint Meritorious Unit Award
Army Superior Unit Award
US Army Airborne Parachutist Badge
Ranger Tab
Combat Infantryman Badge

Memorial Day—Al Blozis

LOONG BACK 
by John Turney

Al Blozis was 6-6, 250 pounds, huge by the days standard of his day. He was a tackle for the New York Giants. In retrospect, he would have been the NFL's defensive player of the year in 1943. On film, he was just dominant. We've seen just a few full games of his from that year and he always stood out. He was listed as a tackle, though alignments were different then. 

Like Arnie Weinmesiter a decade later, he lined up over an offensive tackle and today would be called a defensive end. The ends were what would not be outside linebacker in 2-point (usually) stance. Regardless, he was a dominant player. According to Mel Hein, “If he hadn’t been killed, he could have been the greatest tackle who ever played football.”

He was All-Pro in 1943 and a member of the NFL 1940s All-Decade Team as well. After being refused entry to the military due to his excessive size he served in United States Army from 1943–1945 and was a Second lieutenant and his unit was the 28th Infantry Division SSI in World War II.
Early in 1945 one of the patrols under his command did not return. Blozis went to search for them and he never returned from that mission. Blozis was killed by German machine-gun fire during the search which was part of the battle of the Black Mountain, in the Vosges Mountains near Colmar, France.




This account is from the Georgetown University Website. This is a letter sent to a now-defunct website that appears to have been saved by Georgetown. And we are thankful and will show it in its entirety—

"Hello, Ray. 

My name is Paul Lambert, and I just stumbled on to your Website and story of Al Blozis. It was very interesting to me because I was one of the four he went looking for.


I remember the day he led us down to the little village in the valley below. It was my birthday. There were 12 of us, but a German sniper wounded one of the men just before we reached the little village.

I was a Machine Gunner. Al sent me and three others to the furthest outpost. I don't know where he sent the other seven, but evidently, they all got out of there safely. As soon as we got to the place where we were to set up the machine gun, a big old farmhouse at end of the valley, a German sniper got one of my 3 buddies and killed him. That left only three of us to manage that gun 24 hours-a-day for five days. We were pretty much exhausted and just about out of ammo and food.

On that last day, I knew I had to get back to the command post that Al had set up in the little schoolhouse at the bottom of the mountain where we entered the village. It was snowing and visibility was next to zero. I left my two buddies to man the gun and took off very cautiously toward the Command post about a quarter mile away. In the dense snow, as I got about halfway, I saw a huge form advancing toward me. I stopped with my pistol ready, and then suddenly realized it was Lt. Blozis. And he recognized me. I was about to say something, but he motioned to me to be quiet. Just then there was a blast from a German machine gun, and Lt. Blozis fell backward to the ground. I carefully crawled on my stomach to him, but he was dead. He had several bullet holes in his body. I could do nothing except getting back to my outpost.

I knew nothing about what was happening to my Company. When I got back, I told my two surviving buddies what had happened. We didn't know what to do because we had no orders or any communications. We knew that we just couldn't desert our post. If we didn't get help very soon, we were goners because the Germans were not taking any prisoners. Just toward evening, an old man from the village came to us and told us that we had to get out of there because our comrades had all left. He told us we were surrounded by Germans and he pointed out the only chance we had of getting out of there. He showed us the direction to go and where to start climbing back over the mountain that was the least German-infested route. It took us four nights of climbing in waist-high snow to get over the mountaintop and over to the American side. We only had to kill one German soldier on the way out.

The rest of the story is long and I won't get into it. However I will say, we were able to get back to our outfit just in time to join the big attack on Colmar. The ironic part of the story is that, as we were advancing under artillery fire from the Germans, I was alongside Lt. Blozis's replacement: Lt. Johns. It was his first time in battle. I had to stop along the road to adjust one of my shoes that was hurting me. A few seconds later, an artillery shell came in just about on top of the new Lt. and instantly killed him.

There is no one else that knows the end of this story except one buddy who I know is still living somewhere in Texas. These are the facts. Lt. Blozis was a Real American Hero who would never leave any of his men under any circumstances. Now you know the whole story of Lt. Blozis' life and how and why it ended. I am 83 years old and I would hate to have died and taken this with me.

Paul Lambert"


Here is a comic book version of Blozis' life—

Memorial Day—Bob Kalsu

LOOKING BACK
By John Turney


From Wikipedia:
Kalsu was a 6-3, 235-pound guard out of the University of Oklahoma. 
Kalsu was a starting guard for the Bills in 1968. He played the entire season and was the Bills' team rookie-of-the-year. Following the 1968 season, to satisfy his Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) obligation, he entered the U.S. Army as a second lieutenant and arrived in South Vietnam in November 1969 as part of the 101st Airborne Division. He was killed in action on July 21, 1970, when his unit came under enemy mortar fire at FSB Ripcord near the A Shau Valley

He was awarded the following medals:
Parachutist Badge
Bronze Star Medal
Purple Heart Medal
Army Commendation Medal
National Defense Service Medal
Vietnam Service Medal (with 3 bronze service stars)
South Vietnamese Gallantry Cross with Palm
Vietnam Campaign Medal

This is the entry for Kalsu on the virtual Viet Nam Wall—

Tuesday, May 21, 2019

The Top T-Formation Quarterbacks in NFL History

OPINION
By John Turney
Quarterbacks are always hard to evaluate. All we can say is we DO look at stats, but we also look at championships. To the stat-obsessed that is verboten. But winning is the object of the game "we play to win the game" said Herm Edwards. Bill Belichick said, "Stats are for losers".

The T-formation followed the Single Wing and the A-Formation in the NFL. Sid Luckman and Sammy Baugh made the transition, all the rest played fully in some form of the "T". The earlier passers will be handles by Chris Willis of NFL Films.

In addition to the numbers and the winning, we also look at honors and awards (All-Pros and MVPs/Players of the Year). These awards that are voted on by panels or writers and players give a good sense of the season a player had. Sure, statniks (those who think stats the best measure of performance) object, but they are simply applying their own standard to what is performance.

The voters with the AP or PFWA or NEA or Sporting News have their views of on-field performance and when they fill out their ballots and those ballots are tallied, we get a diversity of views. Some, in fact, may prefer stats, others (like us a combination of things) and that is why there are few unanimous picks for any position. So, these awards are a constant, they don't change over time.

Thus, he with the most votes for All-Pro or MVP or Offensive Player of the Year gets the award, no matter if it's 1955 or 2015.

Finally, we have our own eye test and look at intangibles like toughness or intelligence. Our 'eye' test includes the 'gut test' which is this:  Did you get nervous when a particular quarterback was going to face your team? If your gut told you this QB could beat you with his legs, arm, smarts, clutch play or whatever, then he moves up the list. That is why Elway and Rodgers and Staubach are higher than their 'stats' on wins—They were just a cut above when you watched them. They were scary.

To ascertain these things we read the literature of the era, speak to people in the NFL we respect and put it in a blender and make a list.

We will not spend time writing a lot of prose for this installment of the "Best-ever". For one reason it's been done to death. Another reason is it's such a subjective thing, as all of these are, but quarterbacks even more so because there is the additional burden of the Super Bowl/Championships and the W-L record.

There are many websites and blogs devoted to only evaluating quarterbacks. There are numbers, metrics, then more numbers then statistics, then more metrics then more stats and so on. It's just too mind-boggling. We understand how they were, there was a time we liked to create our own so we get it. But AV or DVOA can be useful, we don't count on it.
And after all the numbers, it still comes down to some people have a favorite and will devote thousands of hours trying to "prove" that their view is better than someone else's.

Our take is this: This is the list. Agree or disagree, that's fine. But don't try and 'sell' us your metric of why "QBWinz" is not a "stat" and so on. All people are saying with that argument is that they like Peyton Manning better than Tom Brady. And that's fine. We have our view, others have theirs.

So you can bet someone who is a fan of player A who is a stat king will say "if QB Winz" matter then why isn't Bart Starr higher?

And someone who thinks 'QB Winz' are the only thing will ask why player B who is few Super Bowl rings is higher than he should be will complain.

We say "A pox on both their houses".

We list the players and we take all the things we mentioned and come up with our score. And we will show the score below the player's name. We will also show the MVP awards (a * denotes consensus MVP) and the NFL titles and passing titles and yardage titles listed separately and then "black ink".

The 'black ink' is leading the league in key stats and it includes passing championships and passing yardage titles plus completions, touchdowns, lowest interception percentage and completion percentage.

Back in the day, the NFLPA gave awards (called Mackey Awards) to those who led the league in passing, rushing, interceptions, sacks, receptions, receiving yardage and other categories. They don't get written about much but essentially 'black ink' (denotes bold type and was coined, we think, by Baseball Reference.com) is that same thing.

We are thinking about calling the passing version "Bennys".  Why? The first big-time passer in the NFL was Benny Friedman. He was the first, according to researchers, to throw at least 20 touchdown passes in an NFL season. Of course, we don't want it to be confused with 'bennies' for obvious reasons. But for now, we call it 'Black ink'

CAP = Consensus All-Pro
1AP = First-team All-Pro
2AP = Second-team All-Pro
PB = Pro Bowls

When you see win-loss% in italics, it means some of their career is estimated. And we don't count 'rings' if a player was a backup and barely played.

We have grouped the quarterbacks but also have ranked them. So, before you complain, make sure you check the rank, not the order we show them. A few players are out of order in terms of how we display them.

Here are our rankings—

Mount Rushmore (1-4)
1. Tom Brady
9.62
4-time MVP/POY (2007*, 2010*, 2016, 2017*)
5-time AFC POY (2007, 2010, 2011, 2016, 2017)
6-time NFL Champ
2-time passing champ
3-time passing yards champ
Black ink—14
CAP = 3
1AP = 4
2AP = 1
PB = 14
W-L% = .775
HOF lock

Brady checks all the boxes to a greater degree than anyone—Wins, stats, rings, stats, intangibles. he never looked like he was in a hurry, just calm and smooth. And when it's 4th and 1 he will get you the first down.

The only knock is that it's not implausible to think the Patriots could have lost more of their Super Bowls since they were all close games. Well, then there is the 'Spygate' allegations.

2. Johnny Unitas
9.44
5-time MVP/POY (1957, 1958, 1959*, 1964*, 1967*)
3-time NFL Champ
2-time passing champ
4-time passing yards champ
Black ink—17
CAP = 5
1AP = 6
2AP = 2
PB = 10
W-L% = .649
HOF

His touch is what stood out about watching him throw. That, and his courage in the pocket.

3. Joe Montana
9.33
2-time NFL MVP/POY (1989*, 1990)
1-time NFC POY (1989)
4-time NFL Champ
2-time passing champ
Black ink—10
CAP = 3
1AP = 3
2AP = 3
PB = 8
W-L% = .713
HOF

Like Unitas, great touch, also cool in the pocket. Also mobile and never got rattled.


4. Otto Graham
9.20
6-time NFL/AAFC MVP/POY (1947*, 1948*, 1949*, 1951*, 1953*, 1955*)
7-time NFL/AAFC Champ
5-time NFL/AAFC passing champ
5-time NFL/AAFC passing yards champ
Black ink—23
CAP = 8
1AP = 8
2AP = 2
PB = 5 (AAFC did not have All-Star game)
W-L% = .841
HOF

Master of the square-in. Had a better arm that he gets credit for. He's the ultimate winner.


The Elite (4-13)
5. Peyton Manning
9.10
5-time NFL MVP/POY (2003*, 2004*, 2008*, 2008*, 2013*)
8-time AFC POY (1999, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2008, 2009, 2012, 2013)
2-time NFL Champ
3-time passing champ
3-time passing yards champ
Black ink—16
CAP = 7
1AP = 7
2AP = 3
PB = 14
W-L% = .702
HOF lock

Excellent arm and great brain—A coach on the field. There are some knocks, among them is that he played a lot of his games indoors. If you  switch the numbers from the splits from indoors versus outdoors and then do the same for Brady, the then all-time leader in many of the statistical categories switches from Manning to Brady.

6. Sammy Baugh
8.90
3-time NFL MVP/POY (1947, 1948, 1949)
2-time NFL Champ
3-time passing champ
4-time passing yards champ
Black ink—27
CAP = 5
1AP = 7
2AP = 2
PB = 6 (Pro Bowl didn't exist at the beginning of Baugh's career)
W-L% = .620
HOF

The passing pioneer. Expanded what Benny Friedman did and at one point held all the major passing records.

7. John Elway
8.76
1-time NFL MVP/POY (1987)
3-time AFC POY (1987, 1993, 1996)
2-time NFL Champ
1-time passing yards champ
Black ink—2
CAP = 1
1AP = 1
2AP = 2
PB = 9
W-L% = .643
HOF

More than anything, it was the fear of facing him that ranks him so high. Teams knew Elway could beat them. Really, the Broncos of the 1980s don't get near the Super Bowl with anyone else at quarterback. Once he played in the West Coast Offense (1993-98) he put up excellent numbers, too.


8. Aaron Rodgers
8.74
2-time NFL MVP/POY (2011*, 2014*)
2-time NFC POY (2001, 2014)
1-time NFL Champ
2-time passing champ
Black ink—6
CAP = 2
1AP = 2
2AP = 1
PB = 6
W-L% = .636

Today's Elway. However, he's at a crossroads in his career. Will he stay healthy and happy enough to really become upper-upper echelon? Could throw his 400th touchdown before he throws hi 100th interception.


9. Brett Favre
8.55
3-time NFL MVP/POY (1995*, 1996*, 1997)
4-time NFC POY (1995, 1996, 2002, 2007)
1-time NFL Champ
2-time passing yards champ
Black ink—10
CAP = 3
1AP = 3
2AP = 3
PB = 11
W-L% = .624
HOF

The epitome of the 'gunslinger' quarterback. Set all the passing records until surpassed by Manning and now others. The Vikings brain trust at the time thinks he's the best ever. Rocket arm.

10. Roger Staubach
8.43
2-time NFL POY (1971, 1976)
2-time NFC POY (1971, 1978)
2-time NFL Champ
4-time passing champ
Black ink—8
CAP = 0 1AP = 0 2AP = 1 PB = 6
W-L% = .746
HOF

Amazing that he was never All-Pro. Sometimes a player belies is honors and The Dodger does that. Got a slow start due to his service commitment in the Navy but he had a good arm, good legs, and tremendous competitiveness.



11. Steve Young
8.33
2-time NFL MVP/POY (1992*, 1994*)
2-time NFC POY (1992, 1994)
1-time NFL Champ
6-time passing champ
Black ink—17
CAP = 3
1AP = 4
2AP = 2
PB = 7
W-L% = .657
HOF

Also had a slow start in his career due to choosing money over competition by signing with the USFL. He would have made less, but the Bengals would have taken him and he'd have succeeded Ken Anderson rather than Boomer Esiason. When the upstart league folded he went to the Bucs and then was traded to the 49ers and he sat for four years. Extremely accurate and a great runner. What could have been.

12. Drew Brees
8.27
1-time NFL POY (2009)
4-time NFC POY (2006, 2008, 2009, 2018)
1-time NFL Champ
2-time passing champ
7-time passing yards champ
Black ink—24
CAP = 1
1AP = 3
2AP = 1
PB = 11
W-L% = .589
HOF lock

Exploits his scheme to the maximum. Great touch, amazing timing.


The Winners (14-18, 25)
14. Troy Aikman
8.25
3-time NFL Champ
Black ink—2
CAP = 0
1AP = 1
2AP = 0
PB = 6
W-L% = .570
HOF

The prototype pocket quarterback, he was tall and a great arm and threw a great ball. But, the Cowboys had a Hall of Fame runner and one of the best run blocking lines of all time, so he didn't fill the sky with balls. He ran the offense, threw strikes and won three titles.


15. Terry Bradshaw
8.10
1-time NFL MVP/POY (1978)
4-time NFL Champ
Black ink—2
CAP = 1
1AP = 2
2AP = 0
PB = 4
W-L% = .677
HOF

He had a slow start because he was simply not ready to play in the NFL. Became a good passer with great arm and good deep touch later in his career.



16. Bobby Layne
7.94
3-time NFL Champ
2-time passing yards champ
Black ink—5
CAP = 1
1AP = 2
2AP = 4
PB = 6
W-L% = .603
HOF

A winner. A leader. A partier. Once in camp Layne was arrested for driving under the influence. He decided to hire a lawyer and fight it. On his court date he had a couple of teammates come to watch the trial.

 Layne's lawyer, to answer the prosecution charge that he was intoxicated retorted that Layne was simply suffering from a "case of laryngitis".  One of the teammates at the back of the courtroom said to the others, "Wow! A whole case".

17. Bart Starr
7.83
1-time NFL MVP (1966*)
5-time NFL Champ
5-time passing champ
Black ink—11
CAP = 1
1AP = 1
2AP = 3
PB = 4
W-L% = .618
HOF

Like a Troy Aikman of his time, except he didn't have Aikman's tools.

18. Len Dawson
7.76
1-time AFL POY (1962)
1-time NFL Champ (3 AFL Champ)
6-time AFL passing champ (1 led all pro football)
Black ink—19
CAP = 2
1AP = 2
2AP = 2
PB = 7
W-L% = .616
HOF

In a way, the AFL's version of Bart Starr, but a bit better arm.

24. Bob Griese
7.44
1-time NFL MVP (1971)
2-time AFC POY (1971, 1977)
2-time NFL Champ
1-time passing champ
Black ink—3
CAP = 2
1AP = 2
2AP = 1
PB = 8
W-L% = .619
HOF

Another of the winners, Griese was good scrambler earlier in career, but now would be called a 'game manager'.

The Stat Monsters (13, 19-23)
13. Dan Marino
7.57
1-time NFL MVP/POY (1984*)
4-time AFC POY (1983, 1984, 1986, 1994)
1-time AFC Champ
1-time passing champ
5-time passing yards champ
Black ink—15
CAP = 3
1AP = 3
2AP = 5
PB = 9
W-L% =. 613
HOF

Another gunslinger, sometimes a bit too much. Never had a lot of help but we still have him 13th all-time.

19. Fran Tarkenton
7.55
1-time NFL MVP/POY (1975*)
3-time NFC Champ
1-time passing yards champ
Black ink—7
CAP = 1
1AP = 2
2AP = 1
PB = 9
W-L% = .531
HOF

THE scrambler. Racked up incredible stats for his era. In New York when speedster Homer Jones was a teammate Tarkenton had to adjust for not having a strong arm by getting the ball out sooner and it worked well as Jones was kind of a poor man's Bob Hayes for the Giants during Tark's time there.

20. Sonny Jurgensen
7.54
2-time NFL POY (1966, 1969)
1-time NFL Champ (backup)
1-time passing champ
5-time NFL passing yards champ
Black ink—14
CAP = 1
1AP = 1
2AP = 3
PB = 5
W-L% =. 493
HOF

When we first got into this business my first break came from Frank "Skylab" Ross of College & Pro Football Newsweekly. He once said, "Never let anyone tell you there was a better quarterback that Sonny Jurgenson".  Sonny was the Marino/Brees of his day—Just a picture perfect passer who racked up the stats. Not mobile and not always concerned with reading the defense.

21. Y.A. Tittle
7.53
2-time NFL MVP/POY (1957, 1961, 1962*, 1963*)
1-time passing champ
Black ink—10
CAP = 3
1AP = 3
2AP = 1
PB = 7
W-L% = .550
HOF

Held many career marks when he retired. Too many times he ran into a buzzsaw in the NFL championship games he played in.

22. Dan Fouts
7.50
2-time NFL MVP/POY (1979, 1982*)
2-time AFC POY (1982, 1982)
4-time passing yards champ
Black ink—9
CAP = 2
1AP = 3
2AP = 2
PB = 6
W-L% = .506
HOF

Was coached in 1976 by Bill Walsh and that seemed to turn his career around. Then, in 1978, Don Coryell came to town and he was the new QB who could throw it all around the park. Tough player, smart, too.

23. Warren Moon
7.45
1-time NFL MVP/POY (1990)
1-time AFL POY (1990)
2-time passing yards champ
Black ink—6
CAP = 0
1AP = 1
2AP = 0
PB = 9
W-L% = .502
HOF

Racked up the stats, and did that in the CFL, too. Getting into the Hall of Fame leaped him into his ranking. In many ways, he belongs with the "Near Greats" on our list.


More Winners (24-35, 44)
25. Sid Luckman
7.42
1-time NFL MVP (1943)
4-time NFL Champ
3-time passing champ
3-time passing yards champ
Black ink—11
CAP = 5
1AP = 6
2AP = 3
PB = 3 (Pro Bowls in only part of his career)
W-L% = .740
HOF

He was one of the pioneers of the T-Formation and to this day is the best Bears quarterback ever.

26. Bob Waterfield
7.37
1-time NFL MVP/POY (1945*, 1950)
2-time NFL Champ
Black ink—6
CAP = 2
1AP = 2
2AP = 2
PB = 2 (Pro Bowl not around for all of Waterfield's career)
W-L% = .645
HOF

Buckets could do it all—pass, run, call his own plays, kick, punt, play defense. Otto Graham said he was the best quarterback ever.

27. Norm Van Brocklin
7.33
2-time NFL MVP/POY (1954, 1960*)
2-time NFL Champ
1-time passing champ
1-time passing yards champ
Black ink—4
CAP = 1
1AP = 2
2AP = 1
PB = 9
W-L% = .630
HOF

Won a title in his final year and was a picture-perfect passer. A leader, mean as a snake, critical of teammates to almost a cruel degree.

28. Russell Wilson
7.25
1-time NFL Champ
1-time passing champ
Black ink—2
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 5
W-L% = .674

Efficient, good deep thrower, works off of play action as much or more than anyone. Step-by-step is building a Hall of Fame resume. He's not there yet, but if he keeps his pace up, he will get there.

29. Kurt Warner
7.21
3-time NFL MVP/POY (1999*, 2001*, 2008)
2-time NFC POY (1999, 2001)
1-time NFL Champ
2-time passing champ
1-time passing yards champ
Black ink—10
CAP = 2
1AP = 2
2AP = 0
PB = 4
W-L% = .578
HOF

The leader of the Greatest Show on Turf. Injuries caused a "donut hole" in the middle of his career. He came back with the Cardinals and did well there, taking them to a Super Bowl. Didn't have a big arm but had superb timing and accuracy on his spot throws.

30. Joe Namath
7.03
2-time AFL MVP (1969, 1969)
1-time NFL Champ
3-time AFL/NFL passing yards champ
Black ink—6
CAP = 2
1AP = 4
2AP = 1
PB = 5
W-L% = .496
HOF

Often criticized by modern statniks because his stats don't look great. We've seen lots of film on him and the more you see the more you realize if he came out today, he'd be a top pick and a top player. Such a smooth and fast dropback, lighting quick release and laser arm.

TJ Troup will always say this, "Prior to 1972, the NFL hashes were much wider. And if a team was on the right hash and wanted to throw an 'out' to the left sideline only Namath and Gabriel could make the throw". The same is true for the left hash and a right sideline 'out'.

31. Ken Stabler
6.98
1-time NFL MVP/POY (1974*, 1976)
1-time NFL Champ
1-time passing champ
Black ink—5
CAP = 1
1AP = 2
2AP = 0
PB = 4
W-L% = .661
HOF

It took a while for Stabler to become the Raiders starter. He was the NFL's best QB from 1973-77 but then tailed off. Al LoCasale once said the reason Snake wasn't in the Hall of Fame was because, "He had some great years, but had too many bad years". That sentiment was overcome a few years back when he was voted to the Hall of Fame.

32. Jim Kelly
6.95
4-time AFC Champ
1-time passing champ
Black ink—3
CAP = 1
1AP = 1
2AP = 2
PB = 5
W-L% = .631
HOF

Yes, we know we have Kelly in the 'winners' group and haters will bring up that he lost four Super Bowls, but we view him the same as Stabler or Kemp or Warner. Yes, he fell short, but he played great teams in the Super Bowl three times and against one great defensive coordinator once and had a 'wide right' as well.

33. Jack Kemp
6.70
1-time AFL MVP (1965)
2-time AFL Champ
Black ink—1
CAP = 2
1AP = 2
2AP = 3
PB = 7
W-L% = .633

The ultimate winner-type. Super strong arm, could throw the 'out' from far hash but the question is whether it would end up in Niagra Falls. In the history of the AFL, only Abner Haynes had more rushing touchdowns than Kemp, not Cookie Gilchrist, not Jim Nance, not Paul Lowe.

34. Ben Roethlisberger
6.65
2-time NFL Champ
1-time passing yards champ
Black ink—3
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 6
W-L% = .675

Stands tall in the pocket. Can deliver the ball after extending a play.


35. Joe Theismann
6.61
1-time NFL MVP/POY (1982, 1983*)
1-time NFL Champ
Black ink—0
CAP = 1
1AP = 1
2AP = 1
PB = 2 (plus one Second-team All-NFC)
W-L% = .621

In 1979 Jimmy the Greek said to Brent Musburger on the NFL Today, "Joe Theismann is not a good quarterback". And there was a pause, "He's not?" asked Musburger. "No", the Greek continued, "He's a great quarterback".

Theismann won the ring in 1982 and the MVP in 1983 but we supposed getting crushed by the Raiders in the Super Bowl has cost him the Hall of Fame.

36. Phil Simms
6.55
1-time MVP (1986)
2-time NFL Champ
Black ink—0
CAP = 0
1AP = 1
2AP = 0
PB = 1
W-L% = .597


44. Eli Manning
6.41
2-time NFL Champ
Black ink—0
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 4
W-L% = .504

When the name of the game is winning Eli has to be mentioned. We rank him 44th (maybe generous) but when you knock of the G.O.A.T. twice in the big game, you get credit for it in our book.

The Near Great (37-44)
37. Bert Jones
6.69
1-time NFL MVP (1976*)
1-time passing yards champ
Black ink—3
CAP = 1
1AP = 1
2AP = 1
PB = 1
W-L% = .490

The most talented quarterbacks we've seen are Bert Jones, John Elway, and Aaron Rodgers. Some would add Greg Cook to that list.  Elway and Rodgers have fulfilled their potential. Jones didn't because he had shoulder injuries and finally, a neck injury.

These four quarterbacks had the best arms, had great legs, great competitiveness, smarts, the entire package. What could have been for Jones under the Ted Marchibroda scheme and good health?



38. Matt Ryan
6.65
1-time NFL MVP (2016*)
1-time NFC Champ
1-time passing champ
Black ink—2
CAP = 1
1AP = 1
2AP = 0
PB = 4
W-L%=.586

In the ultimate passing era, Ryan is putting up great numbers that could get him to Hall of Fame. Seems like lots of recent fans and 'experts' are in love with him. And he can be great at times, but in contexts, he's had one great year, several very good ones, but still, he's yet to reach .600 winning percentage and hasn't led the NFL in many passing stats, so let's pump the breaks on the "HOF lock" talk.


39. Ken Anderson
6.60
1-time NFL MVP/POY (1981*)
1-time AFC Champ
4-time passing champ
2-time passing yards champ
Black ink—14
CAP = 1
1AP = 1
2AP = 2
PB = 4
W-L% = .529

Anderson had a very good arm, great running ability. He had a good run from1974-76 then a few years in what Dr. Z called "the doldrums" then great 1981-82 seasons. Those that want him in the Hall of Fame will pick the achievements of the lower-level Hall of Fame quarterbacks and compare there. And we get it. But they seem to ignore the 'doldrums'. And rather than taking the view there may be a handful of quarterbacks in the Hall that may be a bit dubious, they want the slippery slope to continue.

40. Roman Gabriel
6.58
1-time NFL MVP/POY (1969*)
1-time passing yards champ
Black ink—7
CAP = 1
1AP = 1
2AP = 1
PB = 4
W-L% = .570

Gabriel is interested in that before he was a starter (1962-65) his record as a starter was 11-11-1 which is exactly average. But what makes it notable is that all the other Rams QBs in that same time frame combined for a 4-27-2 record.

He was the MVP in 1969, and you can make a case that he should have been the MVP in 1967, as well. Additionally, one could argue he should have been the NFC Player of the Year in 1973 over John Hadl who slumped at the end of the year.

Gabriel avoided interceptions but his willingness to stand tall in pocket and fight defenders caused him to fumble a lot. He was the Rams best short-yardage runner in the late-1960s. He had arm troubles but had a nice comeback season in 1973 with the Eagles.

41. John Brodie
6.50
1-time NFL MVP/POY (1970)
1-time passing champ
3-time passing yards champ
Black ink—11
CAP = 1
1AP = 2
2AP = 0
PB = 2
W-L% = .494

Like Jurgenson, a picture-pefect passer, and sometimes not all that concerned with reading the defense.

42. Boomer Esiason
6.44
1-time NFL MVP/POY (1988*)
1-time AFC Champ
1-time passing champ
Black ink—1
CAP = 1
1AP = 1
2AP = 0
PB = 4
W-L% =. 462

Well-taught by Sam Wyche and effective for a long time, known for his play-action passing and the skill in which he hid the ball.


43. Steve McNair
6.42
1-time NFL MVP (2003)
1-time AFC Champ
1-time passing champ
Black ink—1
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 1
PB = 3
W-L% = .595

Power player. Tough, tough runner and strong-willed layer. Worked himself into an MVP.


The Really Good (45-70)

45. Philip Rivers
6.40
1-time passing champ
Black ink—5
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 8
W-L% = .567

Ultra competitive, odd throwing motion, racks up the numbers.

46. George Blanda
6.28
2-time AFL/AFC MVP/POY (1961, 1970)
3-time AFL Champ
1-time AFL passing champ
2-time AFL passing yards champ
Black ink—8
CAP = 1
1AP = 2
2AP = 2
PB = 4
W-L%=.514

Was the AFL's top quarterback in that leagues first few seasons. He's a dual position Hall of Famer, like Lou Groza, known more for the kicking than his primary position.
47. John Hadl
6.22
1-time NFC POY (1973)
1-time AFL Champ
2-time AFL passing yard champ
Black ink—8
CAP = 1
1AP = 1
2AP = 3
PB = 6
W-L% = .521

Kind of a poor-man's Jurgensen. Had great deep targets in San Diego and then got traded to the Rams in 1973 where he tore up the NFL the first half of the season. Then he hurt his back and it affected his throwing and he tailed off. The Rams GM Don Klosterman knew there was something wrong and when James Harris showed he could play, Klosterman unloaded him to Green Bay for a pile of picks.

48. Cam Newton
6.20
1-time NFL MVP (2015*)
1-time NFC Champ
Black ink—0
CAP = 1
1AP = 1
2AP = 0
PB = 3
W-L% = .561

Strong player, can throw laser strikes when he wants to. Can run, is a leader. Kind of at a crossroads of his career. The next act will be interesting.


49. Carson Palmer
6.02
Black ink—2
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 1
PB = 3
W-L% = .511

Had as good a technique as you can find. Did everything in a textbook way.


50. Donovan McNabb
5.98
1-time NFC POY (2004)
1-time NFC Champ
Black ink—0
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 6
W-L% = .612

Led Eagles to the big game, but came up short. Early in career could run. Likely aided by WCO and Andy Reid's tutoring.

51. Daryle Lamonica
5.93
3-time AFL MVP/POY (1967*, 1968, 1969*)
1-time AFC Champ
1-time AFL passing yards champ
Black ink—5
CAP = 2
1AP = 2
2AP = 2
PB = 5
W-L% = .784

The Mad Bomber was a good 'closer' for the Bills (coming in games and often winning them) before being traded to the Raiders. Made a living really, actually perfecting the vaunted Raiders "Vertical Passing Game".

52. Randall Cunningham
5.84
3-time NFL MVP/POY (1988, 1990*, 1998)
1-time passing champion
Black ink—1
CAP = 1
1AP = 2
2AP = 2
PB = 4
W-L% = .611

The amazing talent. Great arm, as good a runner at the quarterback position as you could find. Often did the superhuman.



53. Brian Sipe
5.73
1-time NFL MVP (1980)
1-time passing champ
Black ink—3
CAP = 1
1AP = 1
2AP = 1
PB = 1
W-L% = .509

Solid corner, worked his way into being an MVP. Not someone with size or amazing arm.

54. Jim Hart
5.71
1-time NFC POY (1974)
Black ink—1
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 1
PB = 4
W-L% = .497

Career was kind of floundering until Don Coryell showed up and he was in a way a 'poor man's Dan Fouts" for the Cardinals. Quick release, could go deep, but made good use of backs in the 3-digit offense.

55. Tony Romo
5.61
1-time passing champ
Black ink—2
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 1
PB = 4
W-L% = .614

The maker of many amazing plays, he had good legs, was smart and was as good an athlete as you could ever hope to have at quarterback.

56. Andrew Luck
5.60
Black ink—1
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 4
W-L%=.616

If he can stay healthy he can vault up the list. He needs some All-Pros, MVPs, some passing titles and some "wins" to do it, but he's capable.



57. Don Meredith
5.44
1-time NFL POY (1966)
Black ink—0
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 2
PB = 3
W-L% = .590

Super tough. Could get ball deep to Bob Hayes.


58. Rich Gannon
5.31
2-time NFL MVP/POY (2000, 2002*)
2-time AFC POY (2000, 2002)
1-time AFC Champ
1-time passing yards champ
Black ink—3
CAP = 2
1AP = 2
2AP = 0
PB = 4
W-L% = .576

Master of the WCO, in some ways a Jon Gruden creation but responded well.


59. Charlie Conerly
5.28
1-time NFL MVP (1959
1-time NFL Champ
1-time passing champ
Black ink—4
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 1
PB = 2 (also All-Conference in 2 other seasons)
W-L%=.600

Was a very good quarterback from 1950-59. TJ Troup thinks he's Hall of Fame-worthy.

60. Joe Ferguson
5.11
Black ink—3
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 0
W-L% = .462

Solid, blue collar type. Perfect for Buffalo.

61. Archie Manning
5.02
1-time NFC POY (1978)
Black ink—1
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 2
W-L% = .263

Stuck in a bad situation for many years. Had great skills, similar to Roger Staubach without the amazing team around him.


62. Ron Jaworski
4.98
1-time NFL/NFC POY (1980)
1-time NFC Champ
Black ink—0
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 1
W-L%=.514

Great arm, many speculate what could have happened if Rams had kept him, rather than going with Haden. Jaworski was just coming into his own and the Rams defense was still good. Instead, the Polish Rifle took the Eagles to the Super Bowl.

63. Jim Zorn
4.97
Black ink—0
CAP = 0
1AP = 1
2AP = 0
PB = 0
W-L% = .415

Better than most people remember. Was a "high blue" (All-Pro level) a few years according to Pro Scout, Inc.

4.91
1-time NFL MVP (1968*)
1-time NFL Champ
1-time passing champ
Black ink—3
CAP = 1
1AP = 2
2AP = 0
PB = 2
W-L% = .632

Super backup. He played for six teams in 21 years. Yes, you read that right. Twenty-one years. However. he started the majority of his teams' games six times and in five of those, he was either a Pro Bowler or had Pro Bowl-type stats (1957, 1963, 1965, 1968, and 1972).

4.88
1-time NFL Champ
Black ink—0
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 0
W-L% = .475

Earned a spot by ending the ridiculous bigoted belief held by many that an African-American quarterback couldn't win a Super Bowl. 

66. Craig Morton
4.75
1-time AFC POY (1977)
1-time AFC Champ
Black ink—1
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 0 (All-AFC once)
W-L% = .566

Strong arm, could get ball deep to Bob Hayes. Kept arm until the end of his career, lost his mobility in the middle of it.

67. Drew Bledsoe
4.74
1-time passing yards champ
1-time AFC champ
Black ink—3
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 4
W-L% = .508

Big-time arm, often held the ball too long but did get the Patriots to the Super Bowl.

68. Michael Vick
4.66
1-time AFC POY (2010)
Black ink—0
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 4
W-L% = .544

Along with Randall Cunningham the best running quarterbacks ever. Vick had a nice 2010 where he was accurate, got the ball out on time as was a very good pocket passer and only ran when necessary.


4.51
1-time NFC POY (1980)
1-time passing champ
Black ink—4
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 1
PB = 2
W-L% = .465

Excellent arm, not much mobility, even early, but threw deep, was accurate and tough.

70. Mark Brunell
4.49
Black ink—2
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 3
W-L% = .517

A poor man's Steve Young.


The Best of the Rest 
These players are not ranked in any real order. some are mentioned for a specific reason (won a ring, had some good passing stats and so on. It's not 100% comprehensive but we tried to mention as many as we thought appropriate.

Danny White
Black ink—0
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 1
PB = 1 (plus two other Second-team All-NFC)
W-L% = .674

Very good athlete, White was an understudy to Roger Staubach for years, but when eh got his chance he got Cowboys close to the Super Bowl, but could never get there.

Joe Flacco
1-time NFL Champ
Black ink—0
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 0
W-L% = .589

Jim Everett
Black ink—2
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 1
PB = 1
W-L% = .418

From 1988-90 no one, not Joe Montana, Randall Cunningham, Marino, Moon, no one threw more touchdown passes than "Blade" Everett.


Black ink—1
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 1
W-L%=.468

Stafford was the NFL ALumni NFL QB of the Year in 2011 and a Pro Bowler in 2014. In our view displayed a lot of guys by playing and running on a bad shoulder.

Black ink—0
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 1
W-L% = .610

The first African-American quarterback to be a regular quarterback for an extended time. 

Joe Kapp
1-time NFL Champ
Black ink—0
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 1
W-L% = .531

A winner. We are throwing in his CFL seasons as we did with Warren Moon as part of our evaluation.

1-time NFC POY (1971)
1-time NFC Champ
Black ink—1
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 1 (plus one more Second-team All-NFC)
W-L% =. 539
Neil Lomax
1-time passing yards champ
Black ink—3
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 2
W-L% = .475

Trent Green
Black ink—0
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 2
W-L% = .496

Dave Krieg
Black ink—1
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 3
W-L% = .560

Chris Chandler
1-time NFC Champ
Black ink—0
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 2
W-L% = .441

Vinny Testaverde
Black ink—0
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 2
W-L% = .423

Jim McMahon
1-time NFL Champ
Black ink—0
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 1
W-L% = .691

Frankie Albert
Black ink—4
CAP = 0
1AP = 3
2AP = 1
PB = 1 (AAFC didn't have All-Star game)
W-L% = .620


Frank Ryan
1-time NFL Champ
Black ink—2
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 3
W-L% = .672

From 1963-67 who threw the most touchdown passes in the NFL? Yes, you are correct. Frank Ryan with 117.

Jim Plunkett
2-time NFL Champ
Black ink—0
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 0
W-L% = .500

To be a Hall of Famer we think a quarterback has to be great in all or most phases—Rings, stats, honors, intangibles, etc. Some push for Plunkett for the Hall. We ask, where is the rest? he has the rings, but what about the consistently good performances, the Pro Bowls, the wins? His Hall of Fame IS the two Super Bowl rings.

Matt Hasselbeck
1-time NFC Champ
Black ink—0
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 3
W-L% = .531


Mark Rypien
1-time NFL Champ
Black ink—0
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 1
PB = 2
W-L%=.603

Black ink—0
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 0
W-L% = .449

Played at a Pro Bowl level in 1981.


Lynn Dickey
1-time passing yards champ
Black ink—2
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 0 (one Second-team All-NFC team)
W-L% = .419


1-time NFL Champ
Black ink—0
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 1
W-L% = .513

1-time NFL Champ
Black ink—2
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 2
W-L%=.576

Black ink—0
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 4
W-L%=.500
Daunte Culpepper
Black ink —3
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 3
W-L%=.410

Tobin Rote
1-time AFL MVP (1963)
2-time Champ (1 NFL, 1 AFL)
Black ink = 8
CAP = 0
1AP = 2
2AP = 0
PB = 2
W-L%=.431


Billy Wade
1-time NFL Champ
Black ink = 4
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 2 (plus one more All-Conference selection)
W-L%=.482

Steve Beuerlein
Black ink = 3
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 1
W-L%=.461

1-time passing yards champ
Black ink—1
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 0
W-L%=.371

Big-time arm. Not a big-time brain.

Tommy Kramer
Black ink—1
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 1
PB = 1
W-L% = .491

Jake Plummer
Black ink—0
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 1
W-L% = .507

The second "Snake" to play quarterback in the NFL.

Norm Snead
Black ink—0
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 4
W-L% = .349

Led NFC in passing in 1972 thanks to Paul Zimmerman. In one late-season game, the Colts pressbox staff failed to record his passing stats. Zimerman noticed and contacted the league offices who contacted Elias Sports Bureau. When added in, his rankings (it was a year prior to the passer rating being introduced) moved to tops in the NFL.

And it's all for naught. When the passer rating did become the standard the books were changed and Billy Kilmer is the NFC passing champion for that year.

Babe Parilli
Black ink—3
CAP = 1
1AP = 1
2AP = 0
PB = 3
W-L%=.520

1-time AFC POY (1995)
Black ink—3
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 1
W-L% = .471

Andy Dalton
Black ink—0
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 3
W-L% = .575

Eddie LeBaron
Black ink—1
CAP =0
1AP =0
2AP =0
PB =4
W-L%=.347

Gary Danielson
Black ink—0
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 0
W-L% = .475


Steve DeBerg
Black ink—2
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 0
W-L% = .382

Not a good arm, but could run a West Coast Offense.

Ken O'Brien
Black ink—4
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 2
W-L% = .459

Jay Cutler
Black ink—0
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 1
W-L% = .484

Big-time arm, but a lot like Jeff George in our view.


Greg Landry
Black ink—0
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 1
W-L% = .464

Pat Haden
1-time NFC POY (1978)
Black ink—0
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 1
W-L% = .645

Charley Johnson
1-time NFL passing yards champ
Black ink—2
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 1 (plus one All-AFC selection)
W-L% = .508


Steve Grogan
Black ink—1
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 0
W-L% = .556

Was a great runner until his knees gave out. Could get ball deep to Stanley Morgan and Harold Jackson pretty well.

Tony Eason
Black ink—1
CAP = 0
1AP= 0
2AP =0
PB =0
W-L%=.556

Don Majkowski
1-time passing yards champ
Black ink—1
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 1
PB = 1
W-L% = .465

Led NFL in passing yards in 1989, was second-team All-Pro and had 7 game-winning drives that year.

Jeff Hostetler
1-time NFL Champ
Black ink—1
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 1
W-L% = .614

A heady player and a career 55-33 win-loss record.


Black ink = 1
CAP =0
1AP = 0
2AP =0
PB = 1
W-L%=.513

Colin Kaepernick
1-time NFC Champ
Black ink—0
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 0
W-L%=.483

In 2012-13 had a 21-8 record (including playoffs) and came very close to winning it all in 2012. A rifle arm, has made throws going to his left that left us in shock.

Milt Plum
1 passing title
Black ink—6
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 1
PB = 2
W-L% = .573

Was efficient, kept ball moving but called a "dink and dunker" by Paul Zimmerman.


Bill Munson
Black ink = 1
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 0
W-L%=.447


Jay Schroeder
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 1
W-L% = .616

A deep thrower, he was coveted enough by Al Davis to trade an All-Pro left tackle for him. Howie Long was not impressed, "I wasted five years of my career with that guy".


Greg Cook
1 AFL passing title
Black ink—1
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 1

As mentioned one of the top talented quarterbacks ever, but was felled my shoulder injuries.



Vince Ferragamo
1-time AFC Champ
Black ink—0
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 0
W-L% = .509

Got Rams to Super Bowl, had them in the game until the end. Threw 30 touchdowns in 1980 then elft for Canada where he stunk it up. Came back was a decent, but Rams grew weary of him and traded him to Buffalo.

David Woodley
1-time AFC Champ
Black ink—0
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 0
W-L% = .651


Bobby Douglass
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 0
W-L% = .311

Incredible runner, strong. Accounted for 17 touchdowns in 1972. Before Cunningham and Vick Douglass was perhaps the best-ever running QB.


Steve Fuller
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 0
W-L% = .452

Only listed because we found some decent art featuring him. A fair backup, a 6-5 record filling hin for Jim McMahon.


CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 1
W-L%=.576

Aaron Brooks
W-L%=.422

Dan Pastorini
W-L%=.479
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 1
PB = 1
W-L%=.561

Nick Foles
1-time NFL Champ
Black ink = 2
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 1
W-L%=.591

Jon Kitna
Black ink = 1
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 0
W-L%=.403

Kerry Collins
Black ink = 0
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 0
W-L%=.450

Black ink = 0
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 1
W-L%=.390

Kordell Stewart
Black ink = 0
CAP = 0
1AP = 0
2AP = 0
PB = 1
W-L% = .585


Sam Bradford
W-L%=.416
Black ink = 1

Accurate, great arm, was mobile when you. But pocket presence left a lot to be desired and was seeming made of glass.  Surrounding cast in St. Louis was awful in terms of linemen and receivers. Not a 'bust' but a big, big disappointment.

Shaun King
W-L% = .583

Charlie Batch
W-L% = .455


Jay Fiedler
W-L% = .617


Was the Broncos starting quarterback in 1968 as a rookie, went to Buffalo and he became a Pro Bowl wide receiver.


Pictured because of the cool art.

There could be more, so if there is someone missing we understand, we can add. But Really this is a celebration of quarterbacks and our take on the top 50 or so QBs of all time. And yes, there are some good ones in the 1950s we could add when we catch our breath, but they won't break the top half of this list. 

Thanks for reading. Art is from Pinterest and artists are Bruce Tatman, Dan Tearle, Chuck Ren, Cliff Spohn, Merv Corning, George Bartell and many others. We thank them.