Thursday, January 23, 2020

Fixing the AP's '65 Toss Power Trap' Diagram

LOOKING BACK
By John Turney

The day after the Super Bowl IV papers who subscribe to the Associated Press' football coverage printed this diagram, label as being made by the AP itself.  It was a good effort but was errant.

Not they have the left guard trapping the right defensive tackle (we think that is what they are trying to convey). But it was the right guard who did the trapping of Alan Page. 

Also, the Chiefs were in split backs or "red" left. The play looks more like this—






The Chiefs playbook we have does not have 65 Toss Power Trap in it, but it does have 56 Power Trap out of Red Left with the tight end motioning to the spot outside the tackle from a flexed position. But it's the same play only reversed—
Why is is called "toss" when there is not toss? Unknown. But the playbook calls plays that begin with fifty or sixty with those names. Teens are 'dive' playes, twenties are "inside runs" and so on.

Also, there is a trap action, but we don't see "power" as we underatand it and have called it. Power connotes a double team at the point of attack with (usually) a pulling guard to trap or even long trap a defensive linemen. As we mention the trap is there, but we don't see a double-team at the point of attack.
All we know is "65 Toss Power Trap" is the most recognizable name for a football play ever and you are going to hear it a lot over the next few weeks as we celebrate the 50th Anniversary of Super Bowl IV with the Chiefs in Supber Bosl LIV.

4 comments:

  1. It was cool watching that game. The Chiefs defence hammered the Viking offence, but I was impressed by Joe Kapps arm strength, as he tried to make a big play.

    On offence Dawson was cool as a cucumber, and they ran well inside.
    Attacking the corners with short outs was easy strategy, that the Jets had done against the Colts as well, though the Jets through slant passes to Sauer as well.

    The halftime show was surreal, and wouldnt happen today. They did a reenactment of the Battle of New Orleans, with actors laying "dead" on the field, and simulated gun smoke everywhere. Different times.

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  2. Is it called "toss" because there was a fake toss to the other running back? Or because it was part of a series that contained an actually toss play to that other back?

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  3. Garrett was an underrated back that KC should never have let go. They might have beaten the Raiders for the division in 1970, had he stayed for that showdown late in the year. Instead, the Chiefs lose that game and get beat by Garrett with the Chargers to close a disappointing season.

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